Vegetable Upside-Down Casserole

Tonight’s dinner ended up really delicious, though for a while there, I was convinced it was going to be a fail.

I picked up this book, used, at the local bookstore.

From it, I decided to make the “vegetable upside-down casserole.” For this, one can use basically any combination of veggies that sounds good. I used zucchini, carrots, peas, broccoli, and microgreens. She suggests you sautee them. I was lazy and did not.

To this baking dish of deliciousness, you add a biscuit-like dough, which is supposed to fill in the cracks as it bakes.

It was at this point that I started to worry. The dough didn’t go to the edges! It wasn’t particularly seep-y, so it didn’t seem to be getting down around the vegetable chunks. I was all set to have to pick up sandwiches on my way back from the afternoon’s plans.

Then, this magic happened:

It was delicious. It tasted like a pot pie without a ton of sauce, basically. I’m definitely going to make this again, perhaps with varying combinations of veggies.

Odds and Ends Pasta

Sometimes, CSA cooking doesn’t look fancy or experimental. Sometimes, you find yourself making “Oh crap, throw the remaining vegetables in” pasta.

Half a large onion, a couple of significantly-sized cloves of garlic (German White, for you garlic afficionados. We went to the Pocono Garlic Festival earlier this month, and I’m still working through my delicious stash…), two zucchini, and two red bell peppers.

Added a jar of tomato sauce (in this case, Classico Cabernet Marinara) and some chopped up basil from my garden.

Let it simmer for a while…

Then served it over tri-color penne.

It was the kind of easy, satisfying, and veggie-packed meal I needed after my afternoon of stock canning. But that is an article for another time. The takeaway here should be – when in doubt, throw the extra veggies over pasta. You are unlikely to regret it.

Vacation

AKA – Life sometimes gets in the way of our best-laid blogging plans.

We went for a long weekend up to Connecticut as a family to celebrate our anniversary, and since we were staying at a family-owned beach house, I had access to a kitchen, and my New Jersey produce came with me. With the exception of Saturday night, when my husband and I got away for a nice dinner out, we ate at home. I did pop down to the local farm stand for some corn – I was dying for it, and we’ve only gotten it in the farm share one year, so I always end up looking elsewhere.

Crab cakes and Salmon-Dill burgers courtesy of Atlantic Seafood.

Swordfish courtesy of Old Lyme Seafood.

The vegetable mix in the second meal is something I’m quite proud of, actually. I had an eggplant and a few summer squashes, and my plan had been to make “fries” out of them… until I realized that I’d forgotten to buy eggs.

I wasn’t going to bother with going back to the store (this was Sunday, and we were leaving Tuesday morning), so I improvised. I’d already discovered by this point that there was no olive oil in the house – something I’d assumed would be there and was incorrect – but I’d brought up tamari and rice vinegar on the off chance that I’d be cooking something out of Thug Kitchen. So, I chopped up all of those beautiful veggies, threw them in a big mixing bowl, and shook in a generous dousing of each of those. I peered through the spice cabinet and found “Italian seasoning” – basil, oregano, etc. I sprinkled some of that in there, as well as some of the lime sea salt that was an impulse purchase at Atlantic.

Threw this all on a sheet pan, and roasted it at 350 for about half an hour.

HEAVEN.

It reheated well for lunch the next day, too.

The takeaway here is, in my opinion, that improvisation almost always ends with some delicious discoveries. Would eggplant fries have been satisfying with a big hunk of swordfish? Sure. Were my last-minute roasted veggies better? YES. Oh, heavens, yes.