Microgreen Meatless Monday

I haven’t been blogging much about my microgreens. I’m new to the world of these tiny vitamin powerhouses, and I’m definitely on a learning curve. (I’ve been finding some interesting articles, though it has taken some creative keyword selection. Most of the information you find when searching “microgreens” relates to growing, rather than cooking.) To add to the learning time, it’s midterm season around here, so my student load is… well… insane. This means that I’ve mostly been using my microgreens as garnish on top of sandwiches or soup, which is not bad or inappropriate in the slightest; it’s just not really noteworthy.

Tonight was different. I got a real burst of inspiration, and I’m so thrilled with how it came out. I had lots of odds and ends to use up in my fridge, and I ran with the Meatless Monday theme. The result ended up being a tempeh, soba noodle, and vegetable salad, and it was sooooooo good.

First, I cubed some tempeh this afternoon and let it marinate. The marinade was a mixture of soy sauce, rice vinegar, garlic vinegar, garlic powder, onion powder, ginger, and maple syrup.

The rest of the work came closer to dinner time, as nothing took a particularly large amount of effort or time. I stir-fried the tempeh and big vegetables (broccoli, bell pepper, sugar snap peas) over high heat – I was going for a bit of a sear. I added the sugar snap peas last, because I did not want them to cook much.

Meanwhile, I cooked and drained the soba noodles – I only used one bundle, since that’s what I had left in my pantry – and rinsed them in cold water. After the vegetables had their quick pass in theĀ  pan, I dumped them in a big salad bowl and stuck them in the fridge for a little while to cool.

Meanwhile, I made the dressing – some EVOO, garlic vinegar, basil-flower-and-orange vinegar (that I began steeping in September), honey, and brown mustard. This made WAY too much dressing, but I’m refrigerating the extra and will use it on salads.

Then, I began to assemble the salad. In went the soba noodles…

… and the greens.

The greens, by the way, were a mixture. I used the remaining garnet mustard from last week, as well as a hefty amount of the signature mix (which is brassica-heavy) and a bit of the alfalfa sprouts. I also threw in some basil leaves from the plant that’s hanging out on my windowsill currently.

A quick toss with some dressing…

Gorgeous.

Happy Meatless Monday, everyone!

The CSA Cookbook

OK, so it’s been quite clear so far in my blogging journey that Thug Kitchen is my favorite cookbook, and quite frankly, my default place to turn when I’m not sure what to do with my vegetables. Now we’ll get our first (of hopefully many) chance to see that I do, in fact, have some variety and range in my sources.

Linda Ly’s cookbook couldn’t have a more straightforward name if it tried – The CSA Cookbook. Subtitled: No-waste recipes for cooking your way through a community supported agriculture box, farmers’ market, or backyard bounty.

Well, then. Amazon impulse purchase back in the spring? Yes, ma’am!

I’ve only scraped the surface of what Ms. Ly shares in this book, but what has impressed me so far is how truly she does provide ways to use what would otherwise be waste, and today I’m focusing on herbs.

No matter how vigilant you are, at some point in the season, you can pretty much guarantee your basil plant is going to “bolt.” It’ll send up flowers that, while pretty and apparently a huge favorite of the bees that hang out in my yard, are kind of awkward to do anything with. When I snap them off, I historically have just used them to stuff a chicken, or added them to my stock bag.

Then I discovered Ms. Ly’s recipe for infused vinegar. My first batch is still steeping – it takes 2 weeks, minimum – but I’m optimistic for it! The vinegar (in my case, white vinegar, though she suggested that one might try champagne vinegar to be fancy – perhaps a future batch. steeps with the basil flowers and orange peel.

We’re already big fans in this household of another of her steeping suggestions: feta cheese with herbs. She gives instructions for using up all the ends of the bundles of herbs that you have sitting in your freezer. Some of her suggestions end up as salad dressings, but this has become a favorite appetizer in our house. My current batch is steeping with garlic chives from the share this week.

Long story short, if you find yourself at a loss for how to handle odds and ends of your share, and you want a cookbook that shepherds you through making the most of the season, this cookbook is right for you. There’s definite truth in advertising with her title.