Squash Pasta Sauce

Life is so cozy at this moment. The snow is falling, there is vegetable broth simmering on the stove, I’ve got spaghetti sauce steeping low-n-slow in the crock pot, and the house is covered in Christmas decorations.

…also I’ve been forced to downshift because my son is sick. This is the second day in a row I’ve kept him home from school, so I’ve needed to focus on what I can do at home.

It occurred to me that I have a huge backlog of photos of recipes that I’ve made recently, but I haven’t taken the time to post about them. I’ll start here and then queue up some further posts for you to enjoy over the course of a few days, while I slide into the last-week-before-Christmas prepping madness.

Since I’ve got regular marinara sauce going in the crock pot right now, let me tell you about the delicious pasta sauce I made the other night.

I’ve still been working my way through the remaining squash from the stock-up share. For this recipe, I used the front-most squash in this picture, which I’m fairly certain is a hokkaido squash. The squashes in the stock-up share are tricky, because I don’t get the benefit of a label. There are SO MANY winter squash varieties! 

I roasted the squash. The easiest method (in my opinion) for roasting winter squash, when you are just aiming for puree, is to cut the squash in half, seed it, and put it cut-side down in a pyrex dish with about 1/2 inch of water. Cook the squash in a 400 degree oven until it is tender – usually about 45 minutes, though that varies with the size of the squash.

Once the squash was roasted, I started sauteeing some garlic in some EVOO. I then proceeded to make a roux… though I made it with Trader Joe’s Pumpkin Almond Milk instead of regular milk. I’ve been shying away from dairy, and I had  this open in the fridge. The flavor combo seemed obvious, too.

You can make a vegan roux by using olive oil and almond milk instead of butter and milk. Follow the same method you would for a traditional roux.
This is delicious in coffee, as well.

I stirred in the squash puree, along with some spices – cinnamon, nutmeg, paprika.

I’d intended to use diced tomatoes, but it turns out I’d run out of them. I used crushed instead, and it worked out fine. I used half of a large can of crushed tomatoes, and then added salt and pepper to taste.

The final product! I boiled some pasta – in this case, trio italiano veggie pasta. I also sauteed chicken and apple sausage in a chef pan before adding the pasta and sauce. If you forego the sausage, the meal is vegan. I recommend saving some of the starchy pasta water in case you need to thin the sauce; I did add a splash at the end.

This dinner was delicious, and my experiment actually yielded enough sauce to freeze some to use another time. It reheated well the next day, as well.

Odds and Ends Pasta

Sometimes, CSA cooking doesn’t look fancy or experimental. Sometimes, you find yourself making “Oh crap, throw the remaining vegetables in” pasta.

Half a large onion, a couple of significantly-sized cloves of garlic (German White, for you garlic afficionados. We went to the Pocono Garlic Festival earlier this month, and I’m still working through my delicious stash…), two zucchini, and two red bell peppers.

Added a jar of tomato sauce (in this case, Classico Cabernet Marinara) and some chopped up basil from my garden.

Let it simmer for a while…

Then served it over tri-color penne.

It was the kind of easy, satisfying, and veggie-packed meal I needed after my afternoon of stock canning. But that is an article for another time. The takeaway here should be – when in doubt, throw the extra veggies over pasta. You are unlikely to regret it.