Tuesday’s share – Week 6

Whew! What a day we had yesterday. Swelteringly hot. I had a “set-up shift” for CSA, which meant that I had to show up early and help load the bins onto the tables, bag shares for people who couldn’t pick up in time, etc. I also desperately needed to go to the grocery store (my Mother in Law brought pizza over, and we rather effortlessly fit the two boxes into my fridge, which is a testement to how empty it was), and I was performing in a community band concert in the evening. As the last line suggests, my awesome Mother in Law came over to help and handled dinner (as well as the mountain of dishes in my sink, whew). We had a lovely evening. The concert was actually the first for the West Orange Community Band, which just formed this winter. I’m glad I’ve been juggling the rehearsals with the rest of my life – it was SO MUCH FUN. Our next concert is August 21st.

I digress.

The share yesterday was bountiful, plus a friend offered me her beets – anyone who knows me knows I won’t turn down more beets. Pictured is the contents of my vegetable share, eggs, and fruit. I got my usual chicken and ground turkey in addition to this, and I ordered some stuff to have on hand for grilling.

Pictured: Eggs, peaches, apples, sugar plums, romaine lettuce, cherokee lettuce, swiss chard, kale, cilantro, 3 cucumbers, 3 summer squash, 2 eggplants, 1 bunch of red torpedo onions, 2 bunches of beets (share size was 1), a half pound of green beans, Kohlrabi, and tomatillos (which were an “extra,” but I like salsa verde.)

I haven’t done anything yet except wash & tear the romaine for a salad later. Some thoughts before I head over to work on the pile (Little Chef is at camp, Littler Chef is napping, and I am in an air conditioned house, thank God. I went out to get some sun before, and I lasted about 10 minutes.): Salsa verde, possibly the plum torte, even though it calls for purple plums. Maybe I’ll experiment and find some new plum recipes. I’d happily eat them all straight, but I’d like to branch out. For the kohlrabi, I think I’ll try mashed – I have an article from a magazine about new ideas for mashing (other than potatoes and cauliflower), and that looks interesting. The kale is likely going to be chopped and frozen. The chard might be frozen; I’m not sure yet. The beet greens look good, so I may freeze the chard and use them as my dark green. I do have a “chard stalk hummus” recipe that I may try instead of just relegating the stalks to a stock pot. The eggplants are the long, narrow type. I may do something funky like eggplant fries or eggplant bacon with them. The cilantro will really have to end up in whatever we do tonight, because it’s wilty with the heat.

No matter what I decide to do, there will be photos. I’ll post here when I can, and if you want more immediate gratification, find me on Instagram! @omgcsa

OMG Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi: possibly the oddest looking vegetable you’ll get all season, and a huge source of confusion for many new CSA members. I mean, really. The first time you look at kohlrabi, it looks like the kitchen equivalent of a UFO. At first, it looks like a root (spoiler alert: it’s not), since it comes with its greens attached like radishes, beets, and turnips. It turns out it’s actually a bulbous stem (yes, what the heck) in the brassica family: the home of cabbage, brussels sprouts, etc.

8 years in to CSA membership, that sure is easy for me to say with a fair amount of nonchalance. However, I was incredibly grateful for google in the beginning. I especially enjoyed this article from Huffington Post, part of a series entitled “WTF, CSA?” Fun tidbit – my blog’s name, “OMG, CSA,” is a send-up to this article.

Many of the recommendations I see for kohlrabi involve eating it raw, comparing it to jicama or radishes. My favorite way to eat it, though, is roasted. It softens and sweetens beautifully, and it matches well with roasted apples, sweet potatoes, turnips, and radishes. (Yes! Roast your radishes! They’re delicious!) Actually, my technique with these vegetables aims to look something like this apple and root vegetable hash from Martha Stewart, but I discovered it was much easier to roast everything in the oven than to do it her way.

The methodology is simple: cube everything. (Make sure you peel the kohlrabi thoroughly – the skin is tough! All the other vegetables I mentioned can keep their skins.) Toss them with olive oil and whatever seasonings you wish. Dump them into a glass Pyrex dish, and roast them in the oven. 375 is a good temperature, but if you’re already cooking something else, there’s room for adjustment. It’s an imprecise science – I’m going to tell you to cook them until they look and feel done. I take the dish out to push the vegetables around and even the browning a couple of times during the course of cooking. Other than that, though, it’s hands-off and easy, easy, easy.

We had chicken for dinner tonight. I had one broiler chicken left in the deep freeze from last season, so it was time to use it up. (I’ve been on a mission for weeks to clear out the freezers, and there’s still food in there! But, I digress. That is a rant for another post.) We had veggies – I only used sweet potato and kohlrabi tonight – as well as more salad from last night. It was delicious.

Yes, that’s Lego Batman in the upper right corner of the frame. I am not known for my professional-grade pictures, and we have a 5 year-old.

CSA 2019 – WEEK 1

I have so much to say, but I am typing one-handed, with my infant son cradled in the other arm, so this may end up as a “To be continued…” post.

Today was the first Bloomfield-Montclair pickup! I wore my veggie dress to celebrate.

We had perfect weather for pickup, and it felt so good to see some familiar faces.

Usually, the first week is unnervingly small. I feel like this year was more impressive than usual. As per our weekly email:

LETTUCE (Red Leaf)
SPINACH
RADISHES
KOHLRABI
GARLIC SCAPES
PEAS
CHOICE OF DILL OR CILANTRO
CHOICE OF ESCAROLE OR ENDIVE (frissee)
There was also an “extra” of Chervil. I took that, anticipating making eggs tomorrow. (It compliments scrambled eggs SO well.)
No fruit share or meat yet (both start next week), but we did get eggs.
Early season pickups are heavy on the greens. I made a beautiful salad to accompany dinner tonight.
Salad greens from a CSA can be intimidating. There they are, typically in massive quantities… and covered in dirt. We’re so accustomed to supermarket power-washed vegetables that it can seem daunting. A few years ago, I settled on a technique for cleaning the grit with little stress.
Use two bowls. Fill both with cold water. agitate the leaves in one, then allow them to rest for a while before moving them to the other bowl. Repeat the process until the water is clear of grit, emptying the bowl each time. I like to dump the water into my rain barrel, personally, to give it a second use. Finish the process with a traditional salad spinner to dry.
Tonight was a fairly easy prep night. I’m looking forward to talking about kohlrabi this week – it was the vegetable that ultimately led to this blog – but for now, I am calling it a night. Welcome to the 2019 CSA season!

Back from the dead

(Or, at least that’s what it feels like.)

This has been a string of tough days and weeks on the real life front, and my  cooking and blogging have suffered. I hope that this has turned a corner, and we can get back to our regularly scheduled summer abundance.

I’ve been sick for two and a half weeks now, though I’ve finally turned a corner and would call myself “mostly better.” Unfortunately, that meant I was sick throughout a brief family vacation to southern Delaware. I still managed to meet my one cooking goal while down there: Aunt Suzy had commented on how appealing my fritatta recipe looked, and I was able to make one for all of us for breakfast at the condo. I’d forgotten how irksome it is to use unfamiliar pans, but it came out okay, regardless.

I used spinach and garlic scapes from my Bloomfield-Montclair CSA share, and summer squash from Coeur et Sol.

What are garlic scapes, you ask?

Whole, they are long and twisty. This is one cut up into sections. They’re the green part that grows out of the top of garlic. They are like a firmer, garlic-flavored chive. They stir fry well, and they pretty seamlessly go into recipes where you’d use garlic (like this breakfast). They also make a mean pesto, but I can do another post on that, later.

I brought all of both of my shares down to the condo with me. Of course, I ended up trucking quite a bit home, but we did eat Crazy Salad at a few meals.

I kept thinking of this salad as a Tale of Two CSAs. The base salad mix came from Coeur et Sol, but there’s spinach in there from Farmer John. The radishes and kohlrabi were from Chelsa, but the carrots came from Farmer John’s booth at the farmer’s market.

… If you’re asking yourself, “What the heck is kohlrabi?” right now, you’re not alone. Kohlrabi was the first “odd” vegetable I experienced via CSA, and from my google searches in the past, I am not alone.

This pudgy, alien-looking vegetable is Kohlrabi. It also comes in purple, though both are white on the inside. It looks like a root, but it’s actually a bulbous stem. It’s a brassica – related to broccoli and cabbage. (Pro tip: this means the kohlrabi scraps do NOT go in the scrap bag for stock. Brassicas get smelly when they simmer.) One use for kohlrabi (the one Farmer John recommends repeatedly, though I do enjoy roasting) is to use it like jicama. I did just that for the salad, thanks to a grater I found in the condo kitchen.

Honestly, it’s perfectly fine like that. It adds a different texture and layer of flavor to the salad. However, I love cubing kohlrabi and roasting it, often with other root vegetables and a bunch of spices. I did this the previous week, with some radishes.

Yum, yum, yummmmmmm.