Hulk Muffins

I posted on the Instagram feed a little while ago about “Hulk Muffins,” but I’m just now getting around to talking about  them on here.

Easy, straightforward ingredients. Even better – sweetened with banana and honey, not refined sugar.
Finished product

My child does not like leafy greens, currently. The only “salad” he will touch is dandelion greens, strangely enough. We get rather inundated with greens over the course of the season, and I’m always looking for new things to do with them. (I can always make pesto, of course, but how much pesto does one person need?) I found the answer in these “Hulk muffins,” which have turned out to be a huge hit with everyone in my family. They are sweet, hilariously green, have no refined sugar, and are a good way to sneak in the extra vitamins.

The recipe for Hulk Muffins is here.

CSA 2019 – WEEK 1

I have so much to say, but I am typing one-handed, with my infant son cradled in the other arm, so this may end up as a “To be continued…” post.

Today was the first Bloomfield-Montclair pickup! I wore my veggie dress to celebrate.

We had perfect weather for pickup, and it felt so good to see some familiar faces.

Usually, the first week is unnervingly small. I feel like this year was more impressive than usual. As per our weekly email:

LETTUCE (Red Leaf)
SPINACH
RADISHES
KOHLRABI
GARLIC SCAPES
PEAS
CHOICE OF DILL OR CILANTRO
CHOICE OF ESCAROLE OR ENDIVE (frissee)
There was also an “extra” of Chervil. I took that, anticipating making eggs tomorrow. (It compliments scrambled eggs SO well.)
No fruit share or meat yet (both start next week), but we did get eggs.
Early season pickups are heavy on the greens. I made a beautiful salad to accompany dinner tonight.
Salad greens from a CSA can be intimidating. There they are, typically in massive quantities… and covered in dirt. We’re so accustomed to supermarket power-washed vegetables that it can seem daunting. A few years ago, I settled on a technique for cleaning the grit with little stress.
Use two bowls. Fill both with cold water. agitate the leaves in one, then allow them to rest for a while before moving them to the other bowl. Repeat the process until the water is clear of grit, emptying the bowl each time. I like to dump the water into my rain barrel, personally, to give it a second use. Finish the process with a traditional salad spinner to dry.
Tonight was a fairly easy prep night. I’m looking forward to talking about kohlrabi this week – it was the vegetable that ultimately led to this blog – but for now, I am calling it a night. Welcome to the 2019 CSA season!

Easter Leftovers III: Soup Time

Leftovers often mean soup. Any time there’s a big portion of meat served, it’s almost a guarantee that soup will be one of the eventual leftovers.

Soup went two ways with this ham.

First, I went with split pea soup. It’s pretty traditional to use ham with split pea. I used ham stock that I made from the ham bone, plus I sauteed pieces of meat that then boiled in with the peas.

The last time I made split pea soup, it came out much thicker than I like. This time? It came out thinner than I like. I’m still learning. To compensate a little, I chunked up the soup by  adding some mixed vegetables near the end.

I’m very proud of the other direction I went with soup leftovers. This was a riff on a “Portugese Kale and Sausage Soup” that I’ve made many times. The soup works well with basically any smoky meat and any dark green. I’ve used sausage, kielbasa, and now ham, and I’ve used kale, spinach, mustard greens, turnip greens, and beet greens.

I sauteed onions and the ham, added spices and broth, and added the greens… and then the secret ingredient that really makes this soup special: brown mustard. If you’re looking for more of a zing, you could add hot sauce, cayenne pepper, or even horseradish. We tend to leave it to the individual servings to spice up.

Both of these soups freeze & reheat well.